Deep tech: the great wave of innovation

In this report, BCG will outline the deep tech approach: the “why now” question; and the characteristics that participants must understand in order to partake and thrive in the deep tech ecosystem.

We can 3D-print wood

Two years ago, pioneers in the 3D printing industry started exploring new materials when they realised that wood waste is a material that could be transformed for 3D printing. The new process can print wood with a grain that mimics any type of tree, from ash to mahogany.

Read the full article

Teaching Diversity And Inclusion To The Billions Of Intelligent Systems Making Autonomous Decisions

Learning — and applying — how to be aware of the needs of diverse groups has more value than ever before. Understanding how to design and program for inclusive and diverse thinking without bias means intelligent systems need to have a progressive learning ability (e.g., machine learning and digital feedback loops), as well as mission-critical capacities that mean they can safely and securely function around humans who may look, sound, move, or think differently from those whom the machines have been designed or operated around.

Read the full article from Forbes

3D Printing in Healthcare

This ceramic ink can 3D-print bones directly into a patient’s body. Here’s how!

The treatment of bone cancers can lead to sections of bone being removed and accident victims may require extensive bone repairs. Up to now, 3D bone printing has involved producing material outside the patient’s body.

But now a new technique developed at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, offers the prospect of doctors being able to create new bone tissue exactly where it is needed during a surgical operation.

Read more here: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2021/04/3d-printer-bones-surgery-medicine/

Sustainability Practice

Jean Raby and Charles Emond oversee more than $1.7 trillion in investments worldwide. They want to see real action on climate change.

Jean Raby and Charles Emond both have a unique perspective on the powerful role that capital can play in driving change. Each worked in corporate and investment banking and on the corporate side of the boardroom table, and now they both oversee major global investment firms. Together, they cochair the Investor Leadership Network (ILN) CEO Council, representing the leaders of 14 global investment firms that want to help drive the transition to a more inclusive and sustainable low-carbon economy.

Read the interview that McKinsey senior editor Diane Brady recently had with Raby and Emond about their increased focus on addressing climate change through ILN, and how they invest.

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